Critical Ideas Related to Racial Theory Found in Compulsory Programs of Over 230 Colleges and Universities: Report

At least 236 colleges or universities have some form of compulsory student training of courses on ideas related to Critical Race Theory (CRT), according to a database containing information from more than 500 institutions.

Among these are 149 institutions that have some form of mandatory teacher or staff training, with 138 making school-wide curriculum requirements mandatory. CriticalRace.org, which compiles the research, told Fox News that these programs focus on concepts such as “anti-racism,” “fairness,” “implicit bias,” and CRT – all of which have fueled the national debate on the influences of left in education.

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Stanford University Campus (David Butow / Corbis via Getty Images)

“Our database shows how race has become a pervasive concern in higher education with an almost universal emphasis that racism is systemic in the United States,” said William A. Jacobson, law professor at the Cornell University who founded the sprawling database.

Jacobson added that “higher education focuses on what divides people, exacerbating rather than solving problems.” At times, research has pointed to alleged racial segregation at both the K-12 and college levels.

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Authors Robin DiAngelo and Ibram Kendi, whose book explicitly calls for discrimination, are widely included among college books and writings, according to Jacobson. For example, Northwestern University School of Medicine made Kendi’s “How to Be an Anti-Racist” mandatory for the summer of 2020. Other institutions have included Kendi’s writings as resources for students.

Ibram X. Kendi at American University in Washington following a panel discussion on his book "How to be anti-racist" September 26, 2019.

Ibram X. Kendi at the American University of Washington following a panel discussion on his book “How to be an anti-racist” on September 26, 2019.
(Michael A. McCoy / For the Washington Post via Getty Images)

So-called “anti-racist” or CRT-associated content is ubiquitous – it appears in curricula, staff training and sometimes in training specifically related to hiring. For example, the University of Central Florida made a commitment in 2020 to conduct Implicit Bias training and other training for everyone involved in our search and search committee processes.

Some have demanded diversity-related content as part of students’ core courses. At Western New England University, for example, the class of 2022 was required to take at least one “anti-racist and cultural skills course.”

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Overall, CriticalRace.org claims to have followed:

  • 520 higher education schools
  • 236 have some form of training or compulsory courses for students
  • 149 institutions with some form of compulsory faculty / staff training
  • 138 have compulsory school-wide material related to program requirements (for example, the University of Pittsburgh compulsory course “Anti-Black Racism: History, Ideology and Resistance”)
  • 109 colleges / universities with compulsory school-wide training for students, including online modules and guidance
  • 70 colleges / universities with department-specific programs (“either full academic courses or statements stating that anti-racism / DEI / CRT / etc. Are integrated into the general curriculum”)
  • 34 colleges / universities with mandatory department-specific training for faculty and staff
  • 20 colleges / universities with department-specific compulsory training for students (“modules, online orientations, orientation programs and all other forms of training that do not correspond to an academic course”)
  • 13 colleges or universities with compulsory school-wide ‘specific search / hiring committee training’

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Jacobson’s findings follow a pattern indicated by numerous reporting and research at other institutions. For example, the Conservative Heritage Foundation sought staff from 65 universities within the five major sports conferences (the Atlantic Coast Conference, the Big 10, the Big 12, the PAC 12, and the Southeastern Conference), and the middle school had 45 people. whose formal responsibility included the promotion of DCI.

  A classroom at the University of Alvernia in Reading, Pa. On September 21, 2021.

A classroom at the University of Alvernia in Reading, Pa. On September 21, 2021.
(Ben Hasty / MediaNews Group / Reading Eagle)

The numbers translated into the fact that the average university saw 3.4 staff promote DCI per 100 full or tenure-track faculty. For the history departments, the staff of DEI was 1.4 times larger than the number of professors.

Last week, The Washington Free Beacon explained how one university effectively offered cash incentives for faculty to infuse equity and social justice into their programs. The program, which offered $ 3,000 in stipends, came under scrutiny from Senator Marsha Blackburn, R-Tenn., And Governor Bill Lee, R-Tenn.

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The defenses of materials associated with CRTs range from categorically rejecting CRT teaching to asserting that the underlying ideas are essential to create an inclusive educational environment.

Outlining a broad “journey for anti-racism and racial equity,” the University of Nebraska-Lincoln said, “We believe it is essential and essential to address anti-racism and racial equity to strengthen our mission and our reputation in teaching, research and service. .

“Although we recognize the pervasiveness of racism in institutional structures, we believe that we have an opportunity, a responsibility and intellectual prowess to meet this societal challenge.”

More broadly, these types of training have been defended as a means of dismantling “systemic biases” against minorities.

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Angela Onwuachi-Willig, an expert in critical race theory at Boston University Law School, told the Boston Globe that CRT has helped people understand the complexity of the breed – beyond the “simple” stories they may have been taught.

“Racism is not extraordinary,” she continued. “Race and racism are rooted in everything we do in our society. It’s rooted in our institutions. It’s rooted in our minds and hearts.”

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