The National Abolition Hall of Fame sheds light on the series’ upcoming episodes

PETERBORO — The National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum Black History Matters 2022 program series continues for its second week beginning Tuesday, February 8.

February’s brief daily “crash courses” in American History began with a welcome and sneak peek from Victoria Basulto, the February 1 programming organizer.

Basulto described the purpose of Black History Matters 2022 and explained how people can attend the free presentations virtually. The videos are available after midnight on the dates indicated and will remain available for at least eleven months.

Black History Matters 2022 is an educational series that aims to shine a light on the history of Black Americans. NAHOF believes that by understanding history, the present can be better understood.

The mission of the National Abolition Hall of Fame and Museum is to honor anti-slavery abolitionists, their work to end slavery and the legacy of that struggle, and to strive to complete the ongoing second abolition – the moral conviction to put an end to racism.

These February programs will address key events in our national history and historical topics that are lesser known or whose implications are not generally understood. Presenters are volunteer scholars, educators, authors, and researchers who support this project by donating their time and talents. This program is funded in part by Humanities New York with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this program do not necessarily represent those of the National Endowment for the Humanities.

Tuesday February 8
After Emancipation: Jim Crow and the Great Migration

Following her presentation on Juneteenth, Victoria Basulto details the fate of black Americans after abolition. It covers some of the legal and de facto discrimination they faced in Jim Crow times and the journey many made to the northern United States in the Great Migration.

Wednesday February 9
The golden islands in black and white

In this presentation, Timothy McLaughlin, Ph.D. details the rich cultural history of the Golden Isles and the black American community that calls it home. For years the islands have been home to the Gullah Geechee, but recently ownership and the land itself have become a source of dispute. This brief historical introduction sets the stage for discussing the murder of Ahmaud Arbery, the legal process, and the outlook for race relations in the Golden Isles.

Thursday February 10
A History of the 14th Amendment

Thomas Hogle, Ph.D. delves into the history behind the 14th Amendment. Dr. Hogle explores the causes of the Civil War, the shaping of the Amendment in the Reconstruction era, and the impact the Amendment continues to have to this day. This investigative story offers a concise account of how the issue of slavery was fundamental in bringing about the Civil War and triggering one of the most significant amendments to date.

Friday February 11
Racial Violence From Abolition to the Age of Civil Rights Pt. 1

In this two-part series, the Honorable Hugh C. Humphreys covers the history of violence against black Americans, from abolition through the civil rights era. His in-depth study will also explore the Reconstruction era, the formation of the KKK, and lynchings. These stories will illuminate the lives of individuals like Emmett Till and activists like Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman. It will then conclude with the Civil and Voting Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965.

Saturday February 12
Racial Violence From Abolition to the Age of Civil Rights Pt. 2

In this two-part series, the Honorable Hugh C. Humphreys covers the history of violence against black Americans, from abolition through the civil rights era. His in-depth study will also explore the Reconstruction era, the formation of the KKK, and lynchings. These stories will illuminate the lives of individuals like Emmett Till and activists like Schwerner, Chaney and Goodman. It will then conclude with the Civil and Voting Rights Acts of 1964 and 1965.

Sunday February 13
Introduction to Brown V. Council on Education and School Segregation

In this introductory video, Victoria Basulto will discuss the history of the Plessy V. Ferguson decision and the “separate but equal” doctrine, the damage it caused to segregated schools, and the fight to end segregation. segregation that culminated with the Brown V. Board of Education Supreme Court decision.

Monday February 14
Interview with Betty Bibbins and desegregation of Virginia schools

In this two-part interview, Betty B. Bibbins, MD shares her remarkable life story and illustrates the courageous actions that individual children have taken in the desegregation of schools.

Bibbins grew up in Portsmouth, Virginia, and attended kindergarten at Sacred Heart School in Norfolk, Our Lady of Victory Elementary School, Cradock Jr. High School, and Cradock High School (1964-1969) during the years of desegregation of Virginia schools.

As a lonely black student at times, Bibbins experienced the difficulties of an education system and society that resisted desegregation.

Bibbins explains how her family and personal beliefs were often the few things she had to her advantage.

For more information and to access daily releases of Black History Matters programs, visit: nationalabolitionhalloffameandmuseum.org/events.html.

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